Music and Mind Control Fill the Air

While the mind control that permeates the airwaves of RADIO’s Paris may be a fantasy, the music is just fantastic and very much real. This playlist is almost entirely filled with music that rang through the streets of 1928’s Paris. There are a few songs that while a bit anachronistic, still inspired the world I created. I recommend listening with shuffle turned on. Enjoy!

Jazz in Paris

The story of jazz in Paris is the story of racism and prohibition in the United States. Jazz first took hold in Paris during and after WWI as members of segregated US military forces including the legendary Haarlem Hellfighters, were heartily welcomed by the war-weary french, a reception they could never find back in the states. These servicemen brought more than freedom for the french, they brought jazz. The most important figure in the earliest days of Parisian jazz was American military jazz band leader, James Reese Europe, whose band played in the streets of Paris, introducing the music to everyone within earshot.

Paris brought a level of freedom to these servicemen as well. While any claim that Paris was free of racisim in the 1920’s or today is absurd, the particular brand of racism was very different from what African Americans faced back home. Many musicians decided to stay rather than return to the harsher realities of the United States and the roots they put down in Paris were also the roots of jazz in the city. This created a growing ecosystem for more American jazz musicians to join.

Prohibition also played a major role in driving musicians to Europe and Paris. Live music and drinking establishments go hand in hand. With the prohibition of alcohol, many musicians found themselves working either illegal bootlegging jobs to make ends meet or working in illegal speakeasies in order to continue working as musicians. In Paris, where drinks poured freely and affordably, and jazz was picking up steam as a major musical force, it only made sense to make the trip across the Atlantic.

Del, the Guitar, and the 1920s

Del Chambers, who finds himself sharing his opium-addicted body with a god in RADIO, had one passion in life, the guitar. His role as a guitar player in a 1920s jazz band was a fairly new occurrence. In early jazz, the banjo was the stringed king of the rhythm section. The 1920s saw an innovation in guitar design and popularity. Luthiers, most notably Lloyd Loar at Gibson, were creating arched topped guitars which were louder and more projecting than their smaller, flat-topped counterparts. Because of this, guitar spent the decade climbing to prominence in the jazz world. However, it was still strictly a rhythm instrument. In his quest to expand what the guitar can do, Del took inspiration from blues musicians such as Lonnie Johnson and Blind Lemon Jefferson. Then, in the mid 1920’s, one jazz guitarist’s style changed how the guitar could be used in a band setting. These innovations sent he and his instrument on a meteoric rise to popularity. This was Del’s idol, the first true jazz guitar solo artist, Eddy Lang.

Eddie Lang

Eddie Lang was born Salvatore Massaro in Philadelphia in 1902. He first brought the guitar to prominence in the jazz world as a rhythm instrument in the early 1920’s but solidified his claim as the father of jazz guitar through his virtuosic solo playing from the mid 20s to the early 30s.
When people think of the original jazz guitar greats, they think of Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt. While these two exceptional talents are easily the most popular early jazz guitarists, Christian was only a child and Reinhardt, an up and coming musician while Eddie Lang was in his prime.
To see his revolutionary skills on display, check out songs like Wild CatApril KissesEddie’s Twister, and more in the playlist above.
Sadly, Eddie Lang died during a routine tonsillectomy in 1933 at the age of thirty.

It’s been a couple weeks since RADIO got its first SPFBO6 review from Travis over at The Fantasy Inn and I want to revisit it here now that I’m finally done squee-ing.

I’m thrilled with the success RADIO has had in the competition thus far. Fist came the recognition of my wife’s spectacular cover design in the SPFBO6 Cover Contest and now I have this excellent review to celebrate. It’s great to know that RADIO has more than just good looks!

What makes me most excited about the review is that the reviewer found the story to be unique and that its uniqueness worked. On the surface, this might not sound like much but we’re talking about a fantasy writing competition. In a genre filled with voracious readers who want their dragons, paladins, wizards, and magic, it can be risky to try something outside the mold. It seems I’ve pulled it off and that is truly rewarding.

To see the full review, click here and I definitely encourage you to do so. To see where all the books in the competition stand currently, go here.

Finally, to give you a small sample of what The Fantasy Inn had to say, and to sum up my happiness, I’ll leave you with the final paragraph from the review.

“RADIO by J. Rushing is a book that will pull you in with the spectacular worldbuilding and keep you invested with the wonderful character arcs. Overall, it was a damn fun read. I’ve never read another book where an ancient opium-addicted god gets a guitar solo in a jazz club while an immortal demon mind controls the crowd… and somehow I suspect I never will again.

This book is also a contender for one of the Fantasy Inn’s SPFBO semifinalists.” 

Travis – The Fantasy Inn

Can’t ask for better than that.

Welcome all to the first of hopefully many posts about my journey in the battle royale that is SPFBO. SPFBO (Self_Published Fantasy Blog Off) is a competition comprised of 300 self-published fantasy books that are either stand-alones or the first in a series. The competition officially stared on June 1st 2020 and I’ve already had some early success so here’s a quick recap of what’s been going on with RADIO.

After entering RADIO in this year’s SPFBO, I was sorted into one of ten blogs who will be judging. RADIO was placed with The Fantasy Inn and I can’t be more pleased. Their reviews are top notch and I can’t wait to see what they thin. Here’s a link to their SPFBO Introduction post explaining their review process and showcasing the top three covers from the 30 books they were allotted. RADIO was one of them!

The Fantasy Inn

Now, RADIO has joined the other top 30 covers out of the 300 entrants in the SPFBO cover contest. Public voting is live now and you can vote for multiple covers. The link to the poll is at the bottom. Even if my cover doesn’t float your boat, there are some amazing covers on the list so get voting!

SPFBO 6 Cover Contest

The covers will also be judged by the bloggers/judges of the competition to find the best cover of the year.

To my surprise and delight, another of the blogs involved in SPFBO decided to do the first of a number of posts where they call out books from the entire competition list that caught their eye. Again RADIO was included in these first 27 books and I’m thrilled. Check out the article below.

Fantasy Book Critic

Spotlight: Intriguing Titles in SPFBO Part I

As the for book itself, over the coming months, the bloggers will read through their allotted books and update the world to their status, post reviews, and reveal who will be going on to the finals. Ten books will enter only one will win.

Stay tuned for more updates on RADIO’s progress through SPFBO. This year is going to be wild.